Townlands of Ballyhannon North & South

Ballyhannon North

Ballyhannan North, or Béal Átha Sheanáin Thuaidh, lies west of the village of Quin. It contains 183 acres of almost entirely agricultural land. Although part of the civil parish of Quin and the electoral district of Doora, it is in some ways almost a village in itself. Due to regular flooding at its northern exit to the Quin-Ennis road, it was colloquially known as the watery village. Today, it is the home to about 40 families. Since the only road through the townland heads away from the village, cross-field access was very much relied on in the past.

The name O’ hAnnáin, is chiefly associated with Limerick but was also very commonly found around Bunratty. They were a noble Dalcassian sept. It was anglised as Hannon after the O was dropped.

Down Survey Name: Keefe East, Parish: Quinkey

1641 Owner(s):John McNemara(Catholic), 1670 Owner(s): Dr Edmund Marae (Protestant)

Unprofitable land: 83 plantation acres, Profitable land: 83 plantation acres, Forfeited: 83 plantation acres

1659 Census: 4 English

1821 Freeholders of Robert Westropp:Denis Cody,John Coleman, Michael Corbett, James Corry, main tenant James Halloran

1821 Freeholders of John O’Callaghan:John Doulighty, John Halloran, main tenant James Halloran

1825 Tithe Survey of property owners:

McGinness

Robert

 

Ballyhenon East

Quin

Hewitt

Robert

 

Ballyhenon East

Quin

Hewitt

William

 

Ballyhenon East

Quin

Ready

Patt

 

Ballyhenon East

Quin

Note: Ballyhenon East probably coincides with the present day Ballyhannon North

1855 Griffiths Valuation family names: Moylan, Scanlan, Halloran, Doolaghty, Coleman, Corbett, Westropp.

1901 Census family names: Moylan, Scanlan, Halloran, Doolaghty

1911 Census family names: Moylan, Scanlan, Halloran, Doolaghty

 

The original area of Ballyhannan extended from Castlefergus to Keevagh. The roadway from Limerick/NMoF via Ardsolas/Doora to Ennis (changed since the railway construction) now marks the south western edge of these townlands. The original Ballyhannon House was situated closer to the border with Keevagh and occupied by a gentleman by the name of Harte in 1778.

The oldest resident living in Ballyhannon North today is Sonny Scanlan. He is still resident in the house where his father and grandfather once lived. A much more detailed account of rural life during Sonny’s early years is given in the recorded interview to be found on the Quin Heritage website.

 

Ballyhannon South

Ballyhannon South, Béal Átha Sheanáin Theas, townland contains an area of 221 acres and lies south west of the village of Quin.Béal Átha, mouth of the ford, would suggest that the name is tied to a feature of the River Rine that marks its territory.

The main feature of this townland is the residence of the Studdert family of Ballyhannon House. A more detailed outline of the history of this house is provided elsewhere within this website. The existing house, built by Thomas Studdertin 1878,was valued at £24 at the time of Griffith’s valuation and was then occupied by his representative John Healy. Other names attached to this house wereWestropp, Blood, Hassetts.

The original area of Ballyhannan extended from Castlefergus to Keevagh. The roadway from Limerick/NMoF via Ardsolas/Doora to Ennis (changed since the railway construction) now marks the south western edge of these townlands. The original Ballyhannon House was situated closer to the border with Keevagh and occupied by a gentleman by the name of Harte in 1778.

Down Survey Name: Keefe West

1641 Owner(s): Delahide, Sir Rowland (Catholic), 1670 Owner(s): McNemara, John (Catholic)

Unprofitable land: 51 plantation acres, Profitable land: 52 plantation acres, Forfeited: 52 plantation acres

1901 & 1911 Census family names: Studdert, Dobson, Fitzgerald, Moylan, Flaherty, Grace, White, Reynolds, Hehir, Bridgeman, Coady, Coffey.

Diana Studdert is recorded as the major land owner in Madara and Ballyhannon in 1906 when applications were made to the Land Commission for the setting of a fair rent

There is an interesting place name on the west side of Ballyhannon South, heading for Jasper’s Bridge/Doora called Ruannaboul. This may have been a sub townland at some stage but now applies to one particular field. This is likely to be an Anglicisation of Ruan nabPoll, meaning red field or place with the springs/wells/caves.

Ballyhannon is today akin to a suburb of Quin, although still predominantly agricultural. Development within is of a slow and sporadic nature and so the townland is likely to retain its rural and village proximity benefits into the future.

 

 

Notes:

  1. Townland boundaries and names have changed and shifted over time so that present day Ballyhannon may not coincide with the territories referred to in historical records referred to above.
  2. Béal Átha Sheanáin is the translation of Ballyhannon from Logainm.ie and is different from the translation given on some other posts within the Quin Heritage website.

Mick Maguire

June 2024

Your content goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the module Content settings. You can also style every aspect of this content in the module Design settings and even apply custom CSS to this text in the module Advanced settings.